Sunday Prayer (Psalm 136)

by | May 2, 2021 | Sunday Prayer

This is the latest in the series of corporate prayers for Sunday worship that I’m writing from the Psalms, working through them in reverse order.

Our God, we give you our praise because you are good. 

We recognize you show loyal love to your people. You are always gracious and good. You are the supreme and one true God—the God of gods and Lord of lords—over all. And your Word gives us reason after reason to praise you.

We recognize you are worthy of all our praise as our Creator, our Redeemer, our Provider. The book of Genesis declares how you performed wonderful works in creation by skillfully making the heavens, earth, sun, moon, and stars. We, as part of your creation, recognize your authority over us. And we are thankful for your loyal love to us. 

Not only are you the God of creation but also of redemption. You, God, powerfully delivered Israel out of bondage: striking the firstborn of the Egyptians, bringing Israel out from among them with a strong hand and outstretched arm. You divided the Red Sea and led Israel through, hurled Pharaoh and his army into the waters, led your people in the wilderness, and then brought them into their inheritance victoriously. 

You showed wonderful, loyal love again and again despite the failures of your people. You wonderfully provide for your people. You rescue your people. We praise you for your loyal love.

You, the God of heaven, also provide for your church. You remembered us in our lowliness. And you’ve qualified us to share in the inheritance of the saints. You’ve delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of your beloved Son. And it’s in Him we have redemption. In Him, we have the forgiveness of sins. 

You are the God of loyal love. 

We give you our praise. 

Amen.

 

 

Brent Niedergall

Pastor, Grammarian, Runner

Brent Niedergall, MDiv, is Associate Pastor at Victory Baptist Church in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. He’s gone to war in Afghanistan, felled towering trees, and parsed Greek verbs.

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Brent Niedergall